Daily Archives: March 26, 2020

Fond Memories of Idiocy, #1

 

Bert_parks_1956

I no longer remember if this was at the Miss America

Pageant, and I’m not even 100% sure it was Bert Parks,

but I do remember that either Bert or someone much

like him decided to show what a regular guy he was by

singing the Elvis anthem “Blue Suede Shoes” on TV. But

because this was American TV in the mid-50s, he had to

clean up the already stupid hyperbolic lyrics (“You can burn my

house, steal my car, drink my liquor from an old fruit jar”) by

replacing the last line with, “Drink my soda from a soda jar”.

 

Who ever heard of a soda jar before that  moment, or since

that moment either? Bert or his lyricist or their censor must

have invented the soda jar in order to make this  Elvis homage

or watered-down Elvis ripoff sound more proper, but even so,

soda jars have been lodged in my brain ever since. [3/26/20]… Read more »

Review of ABBAS KIAROSTAMI AND FILM-PHILOSOPHY

 From the April 2017 issue of Sight and Sound. — J.R.

9780748699902_1

ABBAS KIAROSTAMI AND FILM-PHILOSOPHY _____________________________________________________

By Mathew Abbott. Edinburgh University Press. 167 pp. UK£70.00. ISBN 9780393243123.

__________________________________________________________

Reviewed by Jonathan Rosenbaum

 

 

 

It isn’t only the hefty price that makes this volume look forbidding to most readers of this magazine. However inviting it might seem to regard the features of Abbas Kiarostami as genuine works of philosophy—not merely as philosophical statements but as brazen acts that challenge viewers into making them rethink and reformulate many of their assumptions about both life and cinema—the academic etiquette of tracing this concept through a labyrinth of other philosophers and other Kiarostami critics may often prove to be less user-friendly to the lay reader.  And it must be admitted that for readers more accustomed to journalistic paraphrase than to the rigours of scholarly hair-splitting and jargony word-spinning, a bumpy ride is in store. Mathew Abbott’s Introduction pivots on page 4 from Kiarostami to Stanley Cavell, but by this time the author has already had recourse to the philosophy of Jean-Luc Nancy on the previous page, and he will be chasing after Wittgenstein, Heidegger, and Descartes soon afterwards

 

Even so, this book is after much bigger game than a daunting bibliography.… Read more »